After an intense two-day process called The Choosing, the Wallace McCain Institute at the University of New Brunswick has selected the 11th cohort of its Entrepreneurial Leaders Program (ELP).

This group of 28 entrepreneurs has a collective economic footprint of $138 million in revenue and 602 employees across the greater Atlantic region. With 405 nominations this year, the finalists faced stiff competition in the selection process.

The business leaders in ELP11 will meet for two days each month over the next year in all four Atlantic provinces in an elite program with speakers and peer interaction. After the first year, alumni pledge to continue to meet quarterly, which is a testament to the value of the program in the lives of these CEOs. Entrepreneurs are headquartered in Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia, Newfoundland and Labrador and New Brunswick. Many have operations in multiple provinces.

About the Wallace McCain Institute

The focus of the Wallace McCain Institute at the University of New Brunswick is to support the next generation of senior business leaders in Atlantic Canada. The Institute is a catalyst for shifting the business culture of the region and advancing the values of entrepreneurship. The development of deep relationships and networks is fundamental to how the Institute delivers on its mandate.

Programs include intensive cohort programs where participants interact in a retreat environment for our region’s business leaders (ELP), their Second-in-Commands (2iC) as well as a program focused on multi-generational businesses (ECHO). The Institute also offers elite workshops and special events on themes relevant to entrepreneurs. The Institute uses innovative approaches to convene people, share best practices, enrich learning, and inspire change.

Media contact: Kathleen McLaughlin

Photo: The Wallace McCain Institute has selected 28 entrepreneurs to be the 11th cohort of the Entrepreneurial Leaders Program. Credit: Levi Lawrence.

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