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Psychology Colloquium with Dr. Chris Oriet

Author: Jennifer Marie McWilliams

Posted on Oct 16, 2019

Category: News and Notices

Dr. Chris Oriet, from the University of Regina, will deliver a colloquium talk entitled "Get set(s) to learn about learning and memory!" The colloquium will take place on Friday, Oct. 18 at 3 p.m. in Keirstead Hall's Snodgrass Lounge (K105). All are welcome and encouraged to attend!

Abstract: After viewing sets of similar-looking objects, such as cars in a parking lot or leaves on a tree, what do observers remember? In this talk, I will explore some of the broader implications of this question, which has formed the core of my research program over the last decade. Since Ariely’s compelling demonstration in 2001 that observers represent the statistical properties of sets of objects in memory rather than the individual members comprising those sets, interest in statistical summary representations (SSRs) has snowballed. Initially, research on SSRs was largely limited to exploring their relationship to capacity limitations in attention. More recent work, however, hints that SSRs might also have an important role in learning and memory. I will first review evidence from my lab suggesting that SSRs can be formed incidentally over an extended period of time, making them an excellent vehicle for exploring questions in learning and memory. Next, I will present the results of several experiments demonstrating how variability in encounters with faces contributes to the process of becoming familiar with them. Finally, I will discuss a line of research using a change detection task to show that the processes involved in encoding the average emotion in a set of faces can be dissociated from the processing of the emotion of individual faces. Taken together, the findings from this research program shape an emerging view of SSRs as a fundamental cognitive process that subserves a much wider array of behaviours than initially thought.

Category: News and Notices

Article Contact Information

Contact: Jennifer Marie McWilliams

Email Address: Jennifer.Sanford@unb.ca