Newsroom
News at the University of New Brunswick

Researchers investigate potential benefits of in-home care technology

Author: UNB Newsroom

Posted on Jan 8, 2019

Category: myUNB , UNB Fredericton

A team of researchers from New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Ontario is investigating the effectiveness of a provincially sanctioned in-home care monitoring system that benefits the elderly.

The study, Caring Near and Far, is conducting research into user experiences with Care Link Advantage, a remote monitoring system that claims to help seniors live at home for longer. The technology is currently being used in homes across New Brunswick.

“The many benefits of the elderly staying in their homes and communities is well documented,” says Dr. Cora Woolsey, research coordinator at UNB Fredericton’s faculty of nursing. “Research has shown that seniors want to live in their own homes for as long as possible.”

With Canada’s aging population quickly growing and set to significantly increase over the next few decades, the number of people caring for and supporting their loved ones living at home will also increase. “We’re working to understand the reasons why people are using this service and what they think of it,” says Dr. Woolsey.

“Without the right support, seniors may not feel safe living alone. It can also be challenging for friends and family to dedicate the time needed to care for their loved ones,” she says. “This technology could relieve those people of certain duties, and give them peace of mind that their loved ones are being taken care of.”

If an emergency is suspected, Care Link Advantage alerts family members via phone, text or email. This allows seniors to live in their homes independently, knowing that if an accident or emergency occurs, their caregivers will be immediately notified.

The New Brunswick research team, funded by the New Brunswick Health Research Foundation and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, is exploring both patient and caregiver experiences with the technology. They are currently seeking Social Development clients aged 65 and older. Participants will be asked to share their experiences and opinions of the technology in a one-on-one interview.

Those interested in participating are asked to contact Dr. Cora Woolsey at cora.woolsey@unb.ca or by phone at (506) 447-3094. Participants will receive a $50 honorarium for their time.

Media contact: Hilary Creamer Robinson