To celebrate the new kinesiology building project currently underway on the University of New Brunswick’s Fredericton campus and to commemorate the Lady Beaverbrook Gym, the university placed a time capsule in the cornerstone of the new building today.

Members of the university community, alumni and community members gathered to watch as the time capsule was lowered into a concrete column that will house the capsule for the next 50 years.

UNB’s President Eddy Campbell helped placed the time capsule.

“As a mathematician, I know the chances I will be here in a half-century to celebrate the opening of the time capsule are remote, but I’m proud to be a part of UNB’s history as we look towards its future,” Dr. Campbell says. “No matter how knowledge is spread or where education takes place in 2067, I’m confident that the legacy of our founders and the cultivation of knowledge and innovation will still be happening here on the hill.”

Some of the dozens of items put into the time capsule include a handcrafted pencil from a former kinesiology dean, a Fitbit, the UCard of UNB’s 2017 Student Union president, and a 3D printed whistle created by an engineering student.

UNB Dean of Kinesiology Wayne Albert says that the time capsule project has made him think more about how the study and practice of kinesiology has responded to concerns surrounding society’s health and physical activity habits.

“Health care is set to be one of the largest growing categories of educated employment across Canada in the coming years and I believe a solution to our health-care challenges can be found by understanding and promoting healthy living.”

The capsule, a sealed stainless steel box, will be marked with a commemorative plaque indicating that it is to be opened in 2067, Canada’s 200th birthday.

For more information about UNB’s time capsule, email timecapsule@unb.ca.

Media contact: Natasha Ashfield

Photo credit: Joy Cummings / Photo UNB

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