People from around the globe will soon be descending on Fredericton to attend an international bionics symposium hosted by the Institute of Biomedical Engineering at the University of New Brunswick.

The Myoelectric Controls Symposium 2017 officially kicks off on Aug. 15 at the Delta Fredericton and runs through to Aug. 18.

Since 1972, UNB’s world-renowned Institute of Biomedical Engineering has been hosting the Myoelectric Controls Symposium. It has been held every three years since 2002 and incorporates all aspects of upper limb prostheses.

“At UNB, we are so pleased to see the Institute of Biomedical Engineering’s leadership on cutting-edge research and education foster continued growth in the symposium and interest from around the world,” says Dr. David MaGee, acting vice-president (research) at UNB. “This is a great example of the impact that UNB has on innovation not only here in New Brunswick but across the globe.”

Dr. Jon Sensinger, associate director of the Institute of Biomedical Engineering and one of the symposium organizers, says as in past years vendors will set up to showcase the latest technology in prostheses, there will be panel discussions, workshops, poster presentations and more.

“We have a tremendous lineup of keynote speakers from the United States, the U.K. and Canada. And this year, we are very pleased to feature a lecture from an Australian surgeon who is pioneering revolutionary techniques in connecting prosthesis directly to bone,” Dr. Sensinger says. “They have created quite a stir.”

Dr. Munjed Al Muderis, an orthopaedic surgeon at the University of Notre Dame Australia, will speak on his work in the field of osseointegration at the Myoelectric Controls Symposium 2017, or “MEC17.”

Three keynote speakers – U.K. neurorehabilitation expert Dario Farina, Canadian Paralympic medalist Jeff Tiessen and U.S. neuroscientist Doug Weber – will also take centre stage.

Dr. Dario Farina is a professor and chair in neurorehabilitation engineering in the department of bioengineering at the Imperial College in London, U.K. as well as the editor-in-chief of the Journal of Electromyography and Kinesiology. Neurorehabilitation technology, neural control of movement and biomedical signal processing and modelling are Dr. Farina’s focus areas of research.

Jeff Tiessen, an amputee of nearly 40 years, is the president and publisher of Disability Today Publishing Group, a disability community pioneer and leader for more than 25 years. He is a three-time Paralympic medalist, world-record holder, award-winning journalist, Canadian disability inductee and respected advocate. Through personal experience and a vast network, Mr. Tiessen is keenly aware of the informational needs of Canadians with limb loss.

Dr. Doug Weber is an associate professor in the department of bioengineering at the University of Pittsburgh. Dr. Weber also manages a portfolio of neuroscience and neurotechnology programs as a program manager in the Biological Technologies Office at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.

Further information and a symposium schedule can be found at the Myoelectric Controls Symposium.

Media contact: David Stonehouse

Photo: Attendees at the Myoelectric Controls Symposium 2014. The 2017 edition of the global symposium, hosted by UNB’s world-renowned Institute of Biomedical Engineering, officially kicks off on Aug. 15 at the Delta Fredericton.

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