If Adam Dyker’s research is successful, someday the batteries in your cellphone, laptop computer or even your car will be made of materials that are abundant, renewable and much less toxic.

The assistant chemistry professor at the University of New Brunswick has just received almost $400,000 in research funding to create a laboratory to develop cutting-edge organic batteries.

“The goal is to make batteries that have the active components, the parts that are actually doing the chemistry, be organic molecules rather than metal-based compounds,” Dyker said in a recent interview.

“It’s a fairly new area … The advantages of these are they are safer. A lot of other batteries have toxic metals.”

Organic doesn’t mean fruits and vegetables, but rather carbon and nitrogen compounds associated with organic chemistry.

“These compounds, unlike metals, are a lot more renewable,” said Dyker.

Read the full story at the New Brunswick Business Journal.